our first day

M’s first day

I arrived slightly early to observe M in her classroom on the monitors. To my dismay, I discovered that lunch was eaten at 11:30 (I was previously told 12pm) and that the children’s lunch must be sent with them (I was previously told that I could pack food only if I wanted her to eat a particular meal). When I dropped her off, no one asked me if I’d brought a lunch for her. Because breakfast was provided I had assumed lunch would be, too, and this was what I’d been told (or at least led to believe) when I toured the school. Partly it’s my fault, I guess, for not brushing up on the parent handbook prior to bringing her. So my poor child was trying with all she had to steal food from the plates of all her little classmates, and thwarted at every turn by a teacher.

Throughout the day they take photos of your child and also log when diapers are changed or attempts to toilet, etc. One of the photos shows a small group playing with animals. All of the children (most appear to be under the age of 2) sitting neatly in their seats at the table playing with the figurines, except for my kid, who is being held by the teacher in her lap. It was obvious when I observed her on the monitor and in the classroom that M does NOT stay seated for more than 10 seconds in any chair. She wanders, gets into things, takes things from in front of others, and therefore ends up carried or held by a teacher.

Why are these other tiny children sitting so nicely??? M is big for her age, so it could be that they are actually 2 years old, and used to the classroom ritual. But I know for a fact that at least a few of them have JUST been moved up from the infant room this week!

*sigh* I hold out hope that perhaps in a month or two M will catch on and also be sitting nicely at the table in a chair, eating or doing an activity.

My squirrely child, being restrained, er, held, by the teacher while the other kids sit nicely.

My squirrely child, being restrained, er, held, by the teacher while the other kids sit nicely.

My first day of grad school

A bit of good news here: I only half to drive an hour and a half to class once every other week! Yay! The in between weeks are online only, and I can do them while M is at school.

At first, I felt inspired, sitting there amongst other academics. As the class dragged on, however, I just felt bored. Writing papers, responding to discussion questions online, etc and so on, it just seems so inconsequential to the actual practice of diagnosing and treating the elderly as a primary care practitioner. I’m hoping that that’s just because it’s one of those “theory” classes and that the actual advanced pharmacology, assessment, and clinicals will help to prepare me for what I’ll be doing day in and day out. But who am I kidding… my six years of undergrad did extremely little to prepare me for practicing nursing on living people. It was literally ALL on the job training.

The important thing, though, is that I’m going to be a living, breathing example to my daughter that no matter where you are in life, whatever age, of whatever means, single or married, raising children young or old, trying to pay the bills, etc you can still do whatever you have to do to achieve what you want in life. For me, I want a work schedule that will allow me to be home with my daughter on weekends and evenings. I want a career working with the elderly that doesn’t include routinely and sometimes incessant cleaning up of poop. I want a raise in income (in this case, double what I make now) in order to provide myself and my daughter with the opportunities in life that will grow us as people: lessons, travel, cultural events, etc.

My mother inspired me just by being a single mom, working full-time, and still going back to school for nursing. I know firsthand how difficult that really was. I hope I can inspire the same pride and determination in my own daughter.

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Categories: parenting

2 Comments »

  1. What are you studying and hoping to do professionally in the future? I thought nursing was an awesome, lucrative, flexible career. At least that’s how folks make it seem here in NYC.

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